2016 conference programme

We are delighted to announce the programme for Public Health Science 2016. This year the conference is being held at the Radisson Blu Hotel Cardiff, UK on Nov 25, 2016.

Online booking now open: Please follow this link to HG3 Conferences where you can book your place.

Draft Programme

09.00 Welcome and introduction to the day

Richard Horton, The Lancet
Rob Aldridge, University College London

09.15 Creativity and innovation in public health science

Chairs: TBC

1.     Trajectory of achievement in primary school and development of mental health conditions in adolescence. Muhammad Rahman.

2.     Suicide and self-harm related Internet use: a cross-sectional study investigating the prevalence and characteristics of hospital presenting self-harm patients. Prianka Padmanathan.

3.     Effects of national housing quality standards on hospital emergency admissions: a quasi-experiment using data linkage. Sarah Rodgers.

4.     What is the maternal and child mental health impact of moving into poverty and child and maternal mental health? Findings from the UK Millennium Cohort Study. Sophie Wickham.

5.     Health impacts of the M74 urban motorway extension: a natural experimental study. David Ogilvie

10.30 Tea and coffee
11.00 New methodological approaches to public health science

Chairs: TBC

1.     Content analysis of tobacco industry data on the illicit tobacco trade in UK newspapers during the standardised packaging debate. Karen Evans-Reeves.

2.     Towards a new model of evidence for public health. Harry Rutter

3.     Negotiating multisectoral evidence: a qualitative study of knowledge exchange in transport and public health. Cornelia Guell.

4.     Body mass index and cardiometabolic disease in UK Biobank: a Mendelian randomization study of 119,859 UK Biobank participants. Donald Lyall.

5.     Capturing (and recapturing) an invisible population: Bayesian prevalence estimation of Problem Drug Use in Wales using a five-source model. Chris Emmerson

12.30 Lunch and chaired poster viewing
14.00 Keynote Speeches:

Chair: TBC

1.     Public Health research in Wales. Frank Atherton, Chief Medical Officer, Wales.

2.     Data Linkage: an essential tool for efficient observational and interventional research and service delivery. Ronan Lyons, Clinical Professor of Public Health, Swansea University Medical School

15.00 Tea, coffee and poster viewing
15.30 Implementing public health science in policy and practice

Chairs: TBC

1.     Does exposure to opioid substitution treatment at prison release reduce the risk of death? A national prospective cohort study in England. Matthew Hickman.

2.     Evaluation of the Healthy Start Voucher Scheme: a Qualitative Study of Low Income Mothers’ Perspectives. Susan Browne.

3.     Can continuity of primary care decrease emergency care use? A nested case-control study. Peter Tammes.

4.     Low alcohol consumption and pregnancy and childhood outcomes: time to change guidelines indicating apparently ‘safe’ levels of alcohol during pregnancy? A systematic review and meta-analyses. Loubaba Mamluk.

5.     Impact of a levy on sales of sugar-sweetened beverages within Jamie’s Italian restaurants: interrupted time-series analysis. Steven Cummins.

17.00 Closing remarks

 Richard Horton, The Lancet  

 

 

Public Health Science: Call for abstracts 2016

The Lancet invite abstract submissions for Public Health Science: A National Conference Dedicated to New Research in UK Public Health to be held on Nov 25, 2016. This year the conference will be held in Cardiff.

This year we hope to build on our support for early career researchers by introducing oral and poster presentation prizes. To be entered into this competition please inform us when you submit your abstract if you are a pre-PhD (e.g. MSc student, Foundation Year trainee, Public Health trainee or Academic Clinical Fellow), PhD student, or Postdoctoral trainee (Clinical Lecturers, Clinician Scientist Fellows or equivalent posts). Additionally, Public Health England will sponsor a prize for the best piece of implementation research that will be selected from all submissions by judges at the conference.

Abstracts should be a maximum of 300 words, be written in English, and contain no references, tables, or figures. Submissions should include the following sections: background (including context and aim); methods; findings; and interpretation. Please also include a non-declamatory title (including a study descriptor—eg, randomised); names, titles, highest degrees, and affiliations of authors; postal and email addresses for the corresponding author; any funding received (if none, please state this); and a brief summary of the contributions of each author and any competing interests. Guidelines are available on The Lancet’s website. Reports of randomised trials should follow the CONSORT extension for abstracts.

Please submit your abstract as a Microsoft Word document to The Lancet’s online submission system. To submit your abstract go to http://ees.elsevier.com/thelancet/ stating in your covering letter that the submission is for the Public Health Science conference. The abstract submission deadline is June 20, 2016. After The Lancet peer-review process, participants will be informed of acceptance of abstracts for oral or poster presentation by Aug 25, 2016.

2015 conference programme

Screen Shot 2015-10-02 at 10.50.15

We are delighted to announce the programme for Public Health Science 2015. This year the conference is being held at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK on Nov 13, 2015.

Online booking now open: Please follow this link to HG3 Conferences where you can book your place.

Draft Programme

08.30 Registration
09.00 Welcome and introduction to the day

Richard Horton, The Lancet
Rob Aldridge, University College London

09.15

 

Creativity and innovation in public health science

Chairs: Richard Horton & Serena Luchenski 

A risk calculator for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in London, UK, Oliver Dukes

Sleep duration and risk markers for type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study in children aged 9–10 years, Alicja Rudnicka

How the local built environment affects physical activity behaviour in older adults in the UK: a cross-sectional analysis linked to two national cohorts, Richard Silverworth

Trends in absolute and relative risk of acute myocardial infarction in people with type 2 diabetes in Scotland: a national retrospective cohort study, Stephanie Read

Surviving cancer: pilot of a web-based self-management support programme, eHOPE, Becky Whiteman

10.30 Tea and coffee
11.00 New methodological approaches to public health science

Chairs: Anne Johnson  & Louise Hurst

Does active commuting protect against obesity in mid-life? Evidence from UK Biobank, Ellen Flint

Lessons from comparing narrative synthesis and meta-analysis in a systematic review, G.J. Melendez-Torres

Assessing changes in the burden of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in the context of widespread opportunistic chlamydia screening: Application of a novel Pgp3 antibody assay to a series of nationally-representative household surveys in England (1994-2012), Sarah Charlotte Woodhall

Linkage of population-level administrative hospital data to evaluate maternal influences on infant and child health, Ruth Gilbert

Development of an open source tool for mapping disease clusters, Catherine Smith

12.30 Lunch and chaired poster viewing
14.00 Keynote Speeches:

Rockefeller Foundation / Lancet Commission on planetary health – the challenges for public health science by Prof Sir Andy Haines, LSHTM

Health of the public in 2040: identifying the main health challenges the UK population will face by 2040, and the opportunities to address them by Prof Dame Anne Johnson, UCL.

Chair: Simon Capewell

15.00 Tea, coffee and poster viewing
15.30 Implementing public health science in policy and practice

Chairs: Klim McPherson & Bethan Davies

A primary care pedometer-based walking intervention with and without practice nurse support in 45-75 year olds: PACE-UP (Pedometer And Consultation Evaluation) cluster randomised controlled trial, Tess Harris

Variation in patient experience between General Practice contract types: multilevel analysis of a national cross-sectional survey, Anthony Laverty

Addressing alcohol harms by removing cheap, super-strength beer and cider: a qualitative study of a local alcohol availability intervention, Elizabeth Tyner McGill

Cost-effectiveness and cost of an HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) programme for high-risk men who have sex with men (MSM) in England: results of a static decision analytical model, Koh Jun Ong

A mixed methods study on the prioritisation of cancer and access to cancer drugs: the Cancer Drugs Fund in England, Charlotte Chamberlain

17.00 Closing remarks
Richard Horton, The Lancet  

Poster presentations 2015

Early Career Researcher Group 1                                  

  1. Mobile phone-based intervention for promoting adherence of tuberculosis treatment: a systematic review and Meta-analysis. Chen Shanquan
  2. Vaccination information in public libraries: Results of a catalogue search of the London Libraries Consortium. Dilshad Marikar
  3. Emergency hormonal contraception and body weight: analysis of data from the Health Survey for England 2010. Sarah Woodhall
  4. Characterising the Alcohol Harm Paradox: A population based survey of adults in England. Emma Beard
  5. Association between ethnic minority status at school and bullying and mental health outcomes in early adolescents: cross-sectional analysis of data from the INCLUSIVE study. Leo Bevilacqua

Early Career Researcher Group 2

  1. “Sit Less ScHARR!”: A feasibility study looking at the development, implementation and evaluation of a pilot workplace intervention to reduce sitting amongst staff in a UK university department. Kelly Mackenzie
  2. An investigation of the relationship between perceived exercise capability and childhood obesity: A prospective cohort study. Michael Taylor
  3. A prospective cohort feasibility study investigating effectiveness of a weight-management camp followed by weekly after-school lifestyle education sessions as an obesity intervention for Qatari children. Michael Taylor
  4. Does food portion size differ by level of household income? A cross sectional study using the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey 2008/2011. Nisreen Alwan
  5. Social cohesion, neighbourhood resilience and health: evidence from New Deals for Community study. Vladimir Gordee

Early Career Researcher Group 3

  1. Interpreting ‘community’ within the context of a ‘community’-based regeneration initiative – a qualitative case study. Joanna Reynolds
  2. Frequent attendances to NHS GP-led urgent care centres in London – How many and whom? An observational study. Geva Greenfield
  3. Time trends in hospital admissions for violent, self-inflicted and drug/alcohol-related injury for adolescents in England and Scotland, 2005-2011. Annie Herbert
  4. Reporting guidelines for population health and policy interventions: TIDieR-PHP. Vittal Katikireddi
  5. Associations between GP experience and health outcomes among English adolescents: cross-sectional study of national data. Arrash Yassaee

New Methods

  1. An embedded realist synthesis of what works, for whom, how and in what circumstances to reduce repeat pregnancies in adolescence. Joanna Charles
  2. Understanding area-based community empowerment initiatives as “events in systems” and the implications for evaluating their potential to impact on health inequalities. Emma Halliday
  3. The cost effectiveness of an internet and computer training intervention to improve older people’s independence and mental wellbeing. Lesley Owen
  4. Effects of visual adaptation on perception of and satisfaction with own body size: two randomised studies. Helen Bould
  5. Measuring the contributions of prevention and treatment of illness to changing life expectancy using ‘Avoidable Mortality’: how to deal with new diseases. Ilias Goranitis

Health Protection

  1. Factors influencing uptake of childhood vaccination in the United Kingdom: a thematic synthesis. Alice Forster
  2. Can outbreak research be achieved in a population with impaired capacity? Lessons from a study of scabies outbreaks in residential care. Stefania Lanza
  3. Is the current evidence about costs for outcomes associated with chlamydia sufficiently robust for evaluation of the National Chlamydia Screening Programme? A critique of the evidence from an English perspective. Koh Jun Ong
  4. Video Observed Therapy for Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives. Philip Windish
  5. Bio-aerosol production by patients with tuberculosis during normal tidal breathing: implications for transmission risk – a cohort study. Fatima Wurie

Sexual and Reproductive Health 

  1. Occurrence of domestic violence in gay and bisexual men attending a sexual health clinic and pilot testing of an educational support intervention for sexual health practitioners. Loraine Bacchus
  2. Evaluation of the Health in Pregnancy Grant policy in Scotland: a natural experiment using routine data from 2004-13. Ruth Dundas
  3. Delay in sexual orientation disclosure to healthcare professionals amongst men who have sex with men in the South-East of England: a qualitative analysis. Tom Nadarzynski
  4. How common are chlamydia related bacteria in early pregnancy and are they associated with miscarriage or preterm birth? Community-based prospective cohort study. Pippa Oakeshott
  5. Qualitative synthesis of young people’s views of sex and relationship education (SRE). Pandora Pound

Smoking and Alcohol

  1. The measurable impact of local alcohol licensing policies on population health. Frank de Vocht
  2. A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of screening and brief alcohol intervention to prevent risky drinking in young people aged 14-15 in a high school setting (SIPS JR-HIGH). Emma Giles
  3. Smoking cessation advice delivered to older adults accessing primary care: A qualitative exploration. Lisa Huddlestone
  4. The impact of food insecurity on smoking and quitting behaviours: A survey of food bank clients. Lisa Huddlestone
  5. Perception of the effects of e-cigarettes. Jennie Day

Mental Health

  1. Maternal depression and the risk of injuries in children aged 0-4 years: a population-based cohort study. Ruth Baker
  2. Maternal depression episodes in the 5 years after childbirth among women with antenatal and postnatal depression: a population-based cohort study. Ruth Baker
  3. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 and risk of later depression in older people: follow-up of participants in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Sungano Chigogora
  4. Area deprivation and generalised anxiety disorder in a British community cohort: findings from the EPIC-Norfolk study. Olivia Remes
  5. Is education a demographic dividend? The role of cognitive reserve on dementia-related cognitive decline: a comparison of six longitudinal studies of ageing. Dorina Cadar

Diet, Weight Management and Other Lifestyle Interventions

  1. Takeaway meal consumption and risk markers for coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity in children aged 9-10 years: a cross-sectional study. Angela Donin
  2. An opportunity to reduce cardiovascular and gastric cancer disease burdens and inequalities attributable to dietary salt: IMPACTNCD microsimulation study. Chris Kypridemos
  3. Sugar and artificially sweetened beverage consumption and adiposity changes: national longitudinal study. Anthony Laverty
  4. Lifestyle interventions for obese and overweight pregnant women to improve pregnancy outcome: updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Oteng-Ntim
  5. Teachers as health promoters: a longitudinal study of the effect of a health education curriculum for trainee teachers on their practice in schools. Karen Pickett

Social Determinants of Health

  1. Health and wellbeing of lone parents in welfare to work: a systematic review of qualitative studies. Mhairi Campbell
  2. Dynamic longitudinal associations between social support and cognitive function: a prospective cohort study. Jing Liao
  3. Changes in first entry to out-of-home care from 1992 to 2012 among children in England: analysis of administrative data. Louise Mc Grath-Lone
  4. Developing a framework for identifying and measuring “collective control” as a social determinant of health: Findings from an evaluation of a natural policy experiment in empowerment. Ruth Ponsford
  5. Does education explain the terminal decline in the oldest-old? Evidence from two longitudinal studies of ageing: Newcastle 85+, UK and OCTO-Twin, Sweden. Dorina Cadar 

Population Healthcare

  1. Complications following pelvic organ prolapse surgery: effect of procedure type and the use of mesh, a retrospective cohort study. Rachael Wood
  2. The effect of alpha blocker exposure on cancer specific and overall mortality in prostate cancer patients -a population based cohort study. Beade Numbere
  3. Practitioner-based complementary and alternative therapies in the management of asthma in children and adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Louisa Woollen
  4. Emergency admissions across the transition from paediatric to adult care: cross-sectional analysis of English hospital data. Linda Wijlaars
  5. Service evaluation of a pilot to improve primary care sexual health services in England implemented using a stepped wedge design. Katy Town

Ageing

  1. Successful ageing trajectories at the end of life: A longitudinal population-based cohort study. Theodore David Cosco
  2. Operational definitions of resilience in ageing: A systematic review. Theodore David Cosco
  3. Facilitators and barriers for recruiting and engaging hard-to-reach older people to health promotion and health-related research: a systematic review. Ann Liljas
  4. Sensory impairments and incident disability in older British community-dwelling men. Ann Liljas
  5. How does our decision to smoke and drink in midlife affect our cognition in later life? Findings from the 1946 British Birth Cohort. Martina Vnukova
  6. Is cancer a good way to die? A population-based survey among older adults in the UK. Charlotte Vrinten

Child and Adolescent Health

  1. Global variations and time trends in the prevalence of childhood myopia, a systematic review: implications for aetiology and early prevention. Alicja Rudnicka
  2. Recalibrating the assessment of overweight-obesity prevalence from body mass index (BMI) in UK children of South Asian and black African origin: cross-sectional study based on recent National Child Measurement Programme data. Peter Whincup
  3. Why do more infants die in the UK than in Sweden? An inter-country comparison of birthweight-specific infant mortality between England & Wales and Sweden. Anna Zylbersztejn
  4. Effectiveness of the statutory health assessment in identifying and treating tobacco dependence among residentially looked-after youth: A one-year retrospective review. Lisa Huddlestone
  5. Operation Smoke Storm: effectiveness of a school-based smoking prevention intervention providing insight into the tobacco industry. Lisa Szatkowski

Public Health Science – 2015

The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, University College London, UK Health Forum, and The Lancet invite abstract submissions for Public Health Science: A National Conference Dedicated to New Research in UK Public Health to be held on Nov 13, 2015. This year the conference is being held at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

Abstracts should be a maximum of 300 words, be written in English, and contain no references, tables, or figures. Submissions should include the following sections: background (including context and aim); methods; findings; and interpretation. Please also include a non-declamatory title (including a study descriptor—eg, randomised); names, titles, highest degrees, and affiliations of authors; postal and email addresses for the corresponding author; any funding received (if none, please state this); and a brief summary of the contributions of each author and any competing interests. Guidelines are available on The Lancet’s website. Reports of randomised trials should follow the CONSORT extension for abstracts.

Please submit your abstract as a Microsoft Word document to The Lancet’s online submission system. To submit your abstract go to http://ees.elsevier.com/thelancet/ stating in your covering letter that the submission is for the Public Health Science conference. The abstract submission deadline is June 23, 2015. After The Lancet peer-review process, participants will be informed of acceptance of abstracts for oral or poster presentation by Sept 4, 2015.

A draft programme will be published shortly. Conference bookings will open in July.

Public Health Science – 2014

Public Health Science: A National Conference Dedicated to New Research in UK Public Health held on Nov 19, 2014.

All abstracts from the conference are available online at The Lancet

Programme

09.00 Welcome and introduction to the dayRichard Horton, The Lancet
Rob Aldridge, University College London
09.15  Creativity and innovation in public health science Chairs: Anne Johnson, University College London & TBC
Does a complex intervention by primary care nurses increase walking in 60-75 year olds? Outcomes at three and twelve months in the PACE-Lift (Pedometer Accelerometer Consultation Evaluation – Lift) cluster randomised controlled trial – Tess HarrisFinancial incentives for smoking cessation during pregnancy: A randomised controlled trial – David Tappin

Are Financial Incentives for Breastfeeding feasible in the UK? A mixed methods field study – Clare Relton

Multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial evaluating implementation of a fire-prevention injury prevention briefing in children’s centres. – Toity Deave

Towards enhanced community genetic literacy among a minority

ethnic community: a participatory action research project – Sarah Salway

10.30 Tea, coffee and meet the funders talk
11.00 New methodological approaches to public health science Chairs: Klim McPherson, UK Health Forum & TBC

Using seemingly unrelated equations to assess changes in dietary behaviours during the UK’s economic crisis – Michelle Cecchini

Successful ageing, education and functional trajectories in later life: A longitudinal latent variable modelling analysis – Theodore David Cosco

Active monitoring of potential adverse immunisation events using hospitalisation data and linked analysis in Scotland – Claire Cameron

Explaining ethnic inequalities in health in Scotland: a pilot study linking primary care to Census data to account for ethnic variations in cardiovascular disease – Anne Douglas

What do people fear about cancer? A systematic review and meta-synthesis – Charlotte Vrinten

 
12.30 Lunch and chaired poster viewing
14.00 Keynote SpeechesChair: Martin McKee, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
15.00 Tea, coffee and poster viewing
15.30 Implementing public health science in policy and practice Chairs: Simon Capewell, University of Liverpool & TBC
Reflections And Best Practice Recommendations For Interdisciplinary Working: A Case Study on Identifying The Determinants Of Addiction From The Addiction And Lifestyles In Contemporary Europe – Reframing Addictions Project (ALICE RAP). – Lucy GellInvestigating healthcare rationing in practice: a qualitative study – Amanda Owen-Smith

Primary care competition and the effect of new providers on quality of care in England – Felix Greaves

Attitudes towards lung cancer screening within socioeconomically deprived and heavy smoking communities: a qualitative study – Samantha L Quaife

Interpretation and use of official drinking guidelines by adult men and women in England and Scotland: a qualitative study – Melanie Lovatt

17.00 Closing remarks
Richard Horton, The Lancet